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To: Multiple recipients of list HUM-MOLGEN <HUM-MOLGEN@NIC.SURFNET.NL>
Subject: ETHI: multiplex screening/curricula
From: Hans Goerl <GENETHICS@delphi.com>
Date: Sat, 9 Dec 1995 15:36:38 -0500

1 Reply to the suggestion of multiplex screening for rare diseases and two
suggestions for curricula in genetic ethics.-HSG ed


1.
From: Chris Friedrich <cfriedri@WELCHLINK.WELCH.JHU.EDU>
Subject: Re: ETHI: multiplex screening

> From: Gary Swergold <swergold@BOX-S.NIH.GOV>
>
> There is a very simple and important need for multiplex genetic screening
> that has so far gone un-noticed here.
> The cost of screening for rare disorders is very high, partly because each
> test must be run separately.  In other words, there is a set up cost for
> every test whether one is doing one test or 50 tests.  If one could
combine > the tests for 50 people, each with a separate rare disorder, the
set up > cost for each of them would go down and the cost of testing for
rare > disorders would become more economical.
> Gary Swergold M.D., Ph.D.
> Food & Drug Administration
> Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research
> Division of Cell & Gene Therapy Regulation
> EMail: swergold@box-s.nih.gov

        This would only be true if the cost of testing the other 49
subjects for 49 conditions, for which there is no clinical suspicion, is
less than the costs of testing 50 persons for one condition each.  I'm
not aware of any cost studies, or cost-benefit analyses to prove this.
Also, the counselor providing the pre- and post-test counseling would
have to provide counseling for 50 conditions, in the unlikely event a
subject had an unexpected positive result for one of the other 49
conditions.


Chris Friedrich, M.D., Ph.D.                    Voice   (410) 614-2521
Lipid Research-Atherosclerosis Unit             Fax     (410) 955-1276
Dept. of Pediatrics, CMSC 6-104         Voice mail      (410) 614-1030
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
600 North Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21287

*****************************************************************************
**************


2.
From: David Beck <dabeck@UMDNJ.EDU>
Dr. Rossi raised the question on December 4 as to whether there are
bioethics curricula in existence. I recently became aware of an excellent
program prepared by the New Jersey Association for Biomedical Research in

collaboration with Videodiscovery, Inc.  Jayne Mackta of NJABR has prepared
a videodisc and accompanying printed documentation of "real life issues in
Biology, Genetics, and Biomedical Technology."  The program is geared to the
secondary school level, but it done so well and in sucha sophisticated
manner that it could easily be adapted to other settings.  NJABR can be
reached at 908-355-4456, email emurphy@llnj.ll.pbs.org

--
David P. Beck                                  Internet:dabeck@umdnj.edu
Coriell Institute for Medical Research &          Voice:609-757-4820
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey  Fax:609-964-0254
*****************************************************************************
*****

From: Michael B Holland <bubbaone@MED.UNC.EDU>


There is an excellent bioethics course taught at UNC Chapel Hill. The
administrator is Dr. Cordiero-Stone in the Dept. of Pathology. The Phone
number is 919-966-1396 or 1397, Fax 966-5046. Good luck.

Michael Holland, PhD
Pathology
UNC CH


   
 
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